vendredi 31 mars 2017

Flying water taxis are hitting the rivers of Paris this summer

Parisians will soon have the opportunity to glide down rivers to get around the city, instead of riding in polluting cars. SeaBubble, a company creating flying water taxis, will debut their innovative mode of green transportation in Paris this summer on the River Seine. Think Uber, but for rivers - five people can climb aboard a SeaBubble and pay fares comparable to ridesharing services.

from Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://ift.tt/2nSMfGS
via

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project Building by Frank Gehry, USA

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

New Architecture Development in Pennsylvania, USA – design by Architect Frank Gehry

Mar 31, 2017

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Breaks Ground on Frank Gehry-Designed “Core Project”

Design: Frank Gehry

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

The Philadelphia Museum of Art begins a new phase of transformation and renewal, supported by a $525 million campaign. A key part of this campaign, the Core Project will create a significant amount of new public space within the footprint of the landmark building and add 23,000 square feet of new gallery space for the display of the collection.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Pictures courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art

Philadelphia, PA (March 30, 2017) – The Philadelphia Museum of Art has officially begun the Core Project, a physical transformation and renovation of its main building led by visionary architect Frank Gehry.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

As the next phase in the implementation of the Museum’s Facilities Master Plan, the Core Project will add 67,000 square feet of new public space, an additional 11,500 square feet for the display of the Museum’s rich holdings of American art, and an equal amount of gallery space for the presentation of contemporary art.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Combining much-needed infrastructure improvements with a reorganization of circulation at the heart of the building, the Core Project will greatly improve the experience of the Museum for its visitors, dramatically enhance access for the community, and provide more room for the display of its renowned collection. The Museum will remain open to the public and fully operational throughout the construction period, which will be completed in approximately three years.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Budgeted at $196 million, the Core Project is part of a larger fundraising effort—It Starts Here: Campaign for the Philadelphia Museum of Art—that will enable the Museum to achieve ambitious goals in education and public programming, improved access and community outreach, and the innovative use of new technologies to fulfill its mission and more effectively engage the next generation of audiences, locally as well as internationally. This $525 million comprehensive campaign will renew and improve the Museum’s landmark main building, strengthen its endowment, and support new initiatives that will ensure that it remains one of the city’s most dynamic public institutions and a leader among its peers. The largest cultural fundraising campaign in Philadelphia’s history, It Starts Here has already raised more than $326 million, or just over 62% of its total goal. Three Trustees are spearheading this effort as Campaign Co-chairs: Barbara B. Aronson, David Haas, and Katherine Sachs. Trustee Bruce E. Toll serves as the Campaign’s Vice Chair.

To date, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has received generous lead contributions for It Starts Here from Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest, the late Robert L. McNeil, Jr., and Constance and Sankey Williams. Additional leadership gifts have come from the late Daniel W. Dietrich II, David Haas, Keith L. and Katherine Sachs, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the City of Philadelphia. With such early and strong support in hand as it breaks ground, the Museum is assured of achieving the campaign goals and completing the Core Project.

Tom Wolf, Governor of Pennsylvania, states, “Great cities have great art museums. This was the principle that drove the civic leaders of the early 20th century to construct a magnificent building in the middle of Fairmount Park that we now know as the Philadelphia Museum of Art main building. In the almost 90 years since it opened to the public, the Museum has proved to be a vital educational resource and economic contributor. As the City of Philadelphia experiences a renaissance, the Museum continues to play a critical role in the vibrancy of this great city. That is why as Governor of Pennsylvania I am thrilled to support the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s transformation through the Core Project.”

Jim Kenney, Mayor of Philadelphia, states: “One hundred years ago, civic and political leaders set out to achieve a bold vision, to construct a new art museum building that would increase the visibility of the city and secure its place in the world. And when this new building was completed in 1928, our city received both a cultural heart and a source of civic pride. Now, a new generation of Philadelphians will be able to enjoy this architectural treasure. This museum welcomes hundreds of thousands of visitors from across the region, country, and world. In a given five-year period, this level of activity has an economic impact on the local economy of more than $1 billion and generates over $80 million in tax revenue.

The completion of this project is likely to make those numbers grow. This project is not just vital to the institution, but also to Philadelphia. I frequently speak about the impact public-private partnerships have on Philadelphia and its residents. This Museum’s formation is a shining example of that. And that continues today; I am proud to announce that my Administration has committed $32.5 million of capital support over the next six years to help fund the Core Project.”

The Core Project is part of a long-term Facilities Master Plan developed by renowned architect Frank Gehry. Designed to be implemented in several phases, as time and resources permit, this plan addresses several important goals: the renewal or replacement of antiquated building systems; the reorganization of the interior to improve wayfinding and the addition of new amenities to enhance the visitor experience; and the addition of new gallery space to accommodate a growing collection.

Frank Gehry recalls his first impression of the main building and how he approached this project at the outset: “I walked through the building and I saw that all you had to do was follow the yellow brick road, so to speak. It was all there, and it showed you what you could do.”

As its title suggests, the Core Project—the second phase of the Facilities Master Plan—focuses on the heart of the building. The West Terrace will be entirely rebuilt, with integrated ramps to provide greater accessibility. Lenfest Hall will be renovated, and the auditorium will give way to create a grand new public space, the Forum, which will open up circulation to provide visual connections and access to several spaces, such as the Vaulted Walkway. The historic North Entrance off Kelly Drive will reopen. Also included will be a newly designed restaurant, café, meeting rooms, and most importantly, additional galleries for American art and contemporary art. Mr. Gehry and his design team respected the building’s original architectural language and materials and applied them to the sections that are being altered or renovated, resulting in a seamless blending of old and new.

Timothy Rub, The George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, states, “The promise of the Museum—what it has come to symbolize to Philadelphia over the last century—is matched, indeed exceeded, by the promise it represents in the 21st century. Today, we are thrilled to officially break ground on the latest phase of our Facilities Master Plan. When it is completed in 2020, visitors will see how Frank Gehry’s simple, yet brilliant, design improves the experience and enhances our ability to display more of the collection. This project is complex and touches many parts of the Museum, but we are committed to remaining open to the public throughout. This renewal of our 90-year-old building through the Core Project will enable us to make progress in achieving the four goals laid out in our 2012 strategic plan: to attract new audiences, enhance the Museum experience, activate the collection, and strengthen our commitment to community. As Philadelphians, we are fiscally prudent, and have elected to proceed, with nearly two-thirds of our campaign funding now in hand, and the confidence that we can achieve our fundraising objective within the next three years.”

Gail Harrity, President and COO of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, states, “The changes we are now embarking upon require sensitivity to the unique and defining character of the Museum. There are spaces that will receive a light touch and others that will be bold and transformational in character. Windows that have been long enclosed will now offer exceptional views of the Philadelphia skyline. Visitors will experience a soaring new public space at the heart of the building and be able to access it from an entrance that will be open to the public once again after nearly half a century. They will also enjoy a new restaurant and café that bear Frank Gehry’s unmistakable touch and that open out to the East Terrace. This is about restoring, preserving, and at the same time reimagining the building for Philadelphia’s future.”

Today, the Museum opened a new installation of Frank Gehry’s renderings and architectural model in gallery 154 on the first floor. This will remain on view through late 2018. More information, including a short video about the Core Project, can be found at http://ift.tt/2nEy3kt. (New web pages to launch at approximately 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 30, 2017.)

The first results of the Core Project will be seen in 2019, when the renovation of the historic North Entrance and a major section of the Vaulted Walkway are completed and these areas are reopened. Additional spaces will open throughout 2019 and 2020, when the Core Project is expected to be completed.

The Museum will continue to assess to the timing to undertake the implementation of the final phases of the Facilities Master Plan, which include a new auditorium, additional galleries under the East Terrace that will be accessible from the Vaulted Walkway and Forum, and further expanded educational facilities.

ABOUT THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART

We are Philadelphia’s art museum. A landmark building. A world-renowned collection. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

ABOUT FRANK GEHRY

Frank Gehry has built an architectural career that spans over six decades. Mr. Gehry received his bachelor of architecture degree from the University of Southern California in 1954, and studied city planning at Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Born in Toronto and based in Los Angeles since 1947, Mr. Gehry has produced public and private buildings across America, Europe, and Asia. Hallmarks of Mr. Gehry’s work include a particular concern that people exist comfortably within the spaces that he creates, and an insistence that his buildings address the context and culture of their sites.

Mr. Gehry’s work has earned him several of the most significant awards in the architectural field. He was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in 1974, and his buildings have received over 100 national and regional AIA awards. In 1989, he was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize, honoring “significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture.” Internationally, Mr. Gehry has been honored with myriad awards, including the French government’s National Order of the Legion of Honor, Chevalier, and was later elevated to the rank of Commandeur of the National Order of the Legion of Honor. He was honored with the Golden Lion Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2008 Venice Biennale. In 2014, he was awarded the Prince of Asturias Award for the Arts in Oviedo, Spain. He has received honorary doctoral degrees from a number of universities, and has held teaching positions at Harvard University, the University of Southern California, the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, and Yale University, where he still teaches today.

Frank Gehry


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.




American Buildings

Philadelphia Buildings – Selection

Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care

The Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building at Drexel University
Design: Diamond Schmitt Architects
Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building at Drexel University
photo : Tom Arban

Drexel University Campus Building

Annenberg Public Policy Center
Design: Maki and Associates
Annenberg Public Policy Center
photo SCHOTT USA © Jeffrey Totaro

Annenberg Public Policy Center in Philadelphia

Translational Research Center at Penn, Philadelphia
Design: Rafael Vinoly Architects
Translational Research Center at Penn
photo from architects

Translational Research Center at Penn in Philadelphia




Frank Gehry Architect

Pennsylvania Buildings

American Architecture

GSK Offices Navy Yard

Center for Human Rights Education Philadelphia

National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia

Philadelphia Architect

American Museum Building Designs

Comments / photos for the The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project page welcome

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project : page

Website: Philadelphia

The post The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project appeared first on e-architect.



from e-architect http://ift.tt/2nEcJKk
via

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project Building by Frank Gehry, USA

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

New Architecture Development in Pennsylvania, USA – design by Architect Frank Gehry

Mar 31, 2017

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Breaks Ground on Frank Gehry-Designed “Core Project”

Design: Frank Gehry

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

The Philadelphia Museum of Art begins a new phase of transformation and renewal, supported by a $525 million campaign. A key part of this campaign, the Core Project will create a significant amount of new public space within the footprint of the landmark building and add 23,000 square feet of new gallery space for the display of the collection.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Pictures courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art

Philadelphia, PA (March 30, 2017) – The Philadelphia Museum of Art has officially begun the Core Project, a physical transformation and renovation of its main building led by visionary architect Frank Gehry.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

As the next phase in the implementation of the Museum’s Facilities Master Plan, the Core Project will add 67,000 square feet of new public space, an additional 11,500 square feet for the display of the Museum’s rich holdings of American art, and an equal amount of gallery space for the presentation of contemporary art.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Combining much-needed infrastructure improvements with a reorganization of circulation at the heart of the building, the Core Project will greatly improve the experience of the Museum for its visitors, dramatically enhance access for the community, and provide more room for the display of its renowned collection. The Museum will remain open to the public and fully operational throughout the construction period, which will be completed in approximately three years.

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project

Budgeted at $196 million, the Core Project is part of a larger fundraising effort—It Starts Here: Campaign for the Philadelphia Museum of Art—that will enable the Museum to achieve ambitious goals in education and public programming, improved access and community outreach, and the innovative use of new technologies to fulfill its mission and more effectively engage the next generation of audiences, locally as well as internationally. This $525 million comprehensive campaign will renew and improve the Museum’s landmark main building, strengthen its endowment, and support new initiatives that will ensure that it remains one of the city’s most dynamic public institutions and a leader among its peers. The largest cultural fundraising campaign in Philadelphia’s history, It Starts Here has already raised more than $326 million, or just over 62% of its total goal. Three Trustees are spearheading this effort as Campaign Co-chairs: Barbara B. Aronson, David Haas, and Katherine Sachs. Trustee Bruce E. Toll serves as the Campaign’s Vice Chair.

To date, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has received generous lead contributions for It Starts Here from Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest, the late Robert L. McNeil, Jr., and Constance and Sankey Williams. Additional leadership gifts have come from the late Daniel W. Dietrich II, David Haas, Keith L. and Katherine Sachs, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the City of Philadelphia. With such early and strong support in hand as it breaks ground, the Museum is assured of achieving the campaign goals and completing the Core Project.

Tom Wolf, Governor of Pennsylvania, states, “Great cities have great art museums. This was the principle that drove the civic leaders of the early 20th century to construct a magnificent building in the middle of Fairmount Park that we now know as the Philadelphia Museum of Art main building. In the almost 90 years since it opened to the public, the Museum has proved to be a vital educational resource and economic contributor. As the City of Philadelphia experiences a renaissance, the Museum continues to play a critical role in the vibrancy of this great city. That is why as Governor of Pennsylvania I am thrilled to support the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s transformation through the Core Project.”

Jim Kenney, Mayor of Philadelphia, states: “One hundred years ago, civic and political leaders set out to achieve a bold vision, to construct a new art museum building that would increase the visibility of the city and secure its place in the world. And when this new building was completed in 1928, our city received both a cultural heart and a source of civic pride. Now, a new generation of Philadelphians will be able to enjoy this architectural treasure. This museum welcomes hundreds of thousands of visitors from across the region, country, and world. In a given five-year period, this level of activity has an economic impact on the local economy of more than $1 billion and generates over $80 million in tax revenue.

The completion of this project is likely to make those numbers grow. This project is not just vital to the institution, but also to Philadelphia. I frequently speak about the impact public-private partnerships have on Philadelphia and its residents. This Museum’s formation is a shining example of that. And that continues today; I am proud to announce that my Administration has committed $32.5 million of capital support over the next six years to help fund the Core Project.”

The Core Project is part of a long-term Facilities Master Plan developed by renowned architect Frank Gehry. Designed to be implemented in several phases, as time and resources permit, this plan addresses several important goals: the renewal or replacement of antiquated building systems; the reorganization of the interior to improve wayfinding and the addition of new amenities to enhance the visitor experience; and the addition of new gallery space to accommodate a growing collection.

Frank Gehry recalls his first impression of the main building and how he approached this project at the outset: “I walked through the building and I saw that all you had to do was follow the yellow brick road, so to speak. It was all there, and it showed you what you could do.”

As its title suggests, the Core Project—the second phase of the Facilities Master Plan—focuses on the heart of the building. The West Terrace will be entirely rebuilt, with integrated ramps to provide greater accessibility. Lenfest Hall will be renovated, and the auditorium will give way to create a grand new public space, the Forum, which will open up circulation to provide visual connections and access to several spaces, such as the Vaulted Walkway. The historic North Entrance off Kelly Drive will reopen. Also included will be a newly designed restaurant, café, meeting rooms, and most importantly, additional galleries for American art and contemporary art. Mr. Gehry and his design team respected the building’s original architectural language and materials and applied them to the sections that are being altered or renovated, resulting in a seamless blending of old and new.

Timothy Rub, The George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, states, “The promise of the Museum—what it has come to symbolize to Philadelphia over the last century—is matched, indeed exceeded, by the promise it represents in the 21st century. Today, we are thrilled to officially break ground on the latest phase of our Facilities Master Plan. When it is completed in 2020, visitors will see how Frank Gehry’s simple, yet brilliant, design improves the experience and enhances our ability to display more of the collection. This project is complex and touches many parts of the Museum, but we are committed to remaining open to the public throughout. This renewal of our 90-year-old building through the Core Project will enable us to make progress in achieving the four goals laid out in our 2012 strategic plan: to attract new audiences, enhance the Museum experience, activate the collection, and strengthen our commitment to community. As Philadelphians, we are fiscally prudent, and have elected to proceed, with nearly two-thirds of our campaign funding now in hand, and the confidence that we can achieve our fundraising objective within the next three years.”

Gail Harrity, President and COO of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, states, “The changes we are now embarking upon require sensitivity to the unique and defining character of the Museum. There are spaces that will receive a light touch and others that will be bold and transformational in character. Windows that have been long enclosed will now offer exceptional views of the Philadelphia skyline. Visitors will experience a soaring new public space at the heart of the building and be able to access it from an entrance that will be open to the public once again after nearly half a century. They will also enjoy a new restaurant and café that bear Frank Gehry’s unmistakable touch and that open out to the East Terrace. This is about restoring, preserving, and at the same time reimagining the building for Philadelphia’s future.”

Today, the Museum opened a new installation of Frank Gehry’s renderings and architectural model in gallery 154 on the first floor. This will remain on view through late 2018. More information, including a short video about the Core Project, can be found at http://ift.tt/2nEy3kt. (New web pages to launch at approximately 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 30, 2017.)

The first results of the Core Project will be seen in 2019, when the renovation of the historic North Entrance and a major section of the Vaulted Walkway are completed and these areas are reopened. Additional spaces will open throughout 2019 and 2020, when the Core Project is expected to be completed.

The Museum will continue to assess to the timing to undertake the implementation of the final phases of the Facilities Master Plan, which include a new auditorium, additional galleries under the East Terrace that will be accessible from the Vaulted Walkway and Forum, and further expanded educational facilities.

ABOUT THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART

We are Philadelphia’s art museum. A landmark building. A world-renowned collection. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

ABOUT FRANK GEHRY

Frank Gehry has built an architectural career that spans over six decades. Mr. Gehry received his bachelor of architecture degree from the University of Southern California in 1954, and studied city planning at Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Born in Toronto and based in Los Angeles since 1947, Mr. Gehry has produced public and private buildings across America, Europe, and Asia. Hallmarks of Mr. Gehry’s work include a particular concern that people exist comfortably within the spaces that he creates, and an insistence that his buildings address the context and culture of their sites.

Mr. Gehry’s work has earned him several of the most significant awards in the architectural field. He was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in 1974, and his buildings have received over 100 national and regional AIA awards. In 1989, he was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize, honoring “significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture.” Internationally, Mr. Gehry has been honored with myriad awards, including the French government’s National Order of the Legion of Honor, Chevalier, and was later elevated to the rank of Commandeur of the National Order of the Legion of Honor. He was honored with the Golden Lion Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2008 Venice Biennale. In 2014, he was awarded the Prince of Asturias Award for the Arts in Oviedo, Spain. He has received honorary doctoral degrees from a number of universities, and has held teaching positions at Harvard University, the University of Southern California, the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, and Yale University, where he still teaches today.

Frank Gehry


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.




American Buildings

Philadelphia Buildings – Selection

Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care

The Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building at Drexel University
Design: Diamond Schmitt Architects
Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building at Drexel University
photo : Tom Arban

Drexel University Campus Building

Annenberg Public Policy Center
Design: Maki and Associates
Annenberg Public Policy Center
photo SCHOTT USA © Jeffrey Totaro

Annenberg Public Policy Center in Philadelphia

Translational Research Center at Penn, Philadelphia
Design: Rafael Vinoly Architects
Translational Research Center at Penn
photo from architects

Translational Research Center at Penn in Philadelphia




Frank Gehry Architect

Pennsylvania Buildings

American Architecture

GSK Offices Navy Yard

Center for Human Rights Education Philadelphia

National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia

Philadelphia Architect

American Museum Building Designs

Comments / photos for the The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project page welcome

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project : page

Website: Philadelphia

The post The Philadelphia Museum of Art Core Project appeared first on e-architect.



from e-architect http://ift.tt/2nEcJKk
via

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart

Research Centre ARENA2036, Stuttgart, German Building, Architecture Images

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart

University Building, south west Germany – design by HENN architects

31 Mar 2017

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart

Architects: HENN

Location: Stuttgart, Germany

Research Centre ARENA2036

Research Centre Arena2036

How will the architecture of Industry 4.0 look? What role will people play in the factory of the future? ARENA2036, which will be handed over to its users on 30.03.2017 at the University of Stuttgart’s research campus in Vaihingen, reveals the architecture of completely digitalised and networked production.

Research Centre Arena2036

ARENA2036 stands for „Active Research Environment for the Next Generation of Automobiles“ and makes reference to the 150th anniversary of the first production automobile. Universities, industry and small and medium-sized enterprises come together in the research factory to work on the future of the automobile. Not only the product but also its production process is being completely rethought.

Research Centre Arena2036

Just as the fully automated production of past decades left the assembly line structure intact, in the future all parts will be dynamically actively and freely combinable in space and time in Industry 4.0. As soon as the partially assembled vehicles have wheels and an electric drive, they move under their own power and control to the specific series of downstream production stations that will result in their configuration to order. The vehicle – a robot that assembles itself. Machines and products are beginning to communicate with one another in real time, which calls into question their interface with people. Visual communication is therefore a key precondition for the development work at ARENA2036. No columns obstruct the view of the complex processes across the multifunctional assembly hall. Everyone in the workshops and laboratories of the transverse end block and in the project offices and meeting rooms on the 1st floor along the longitudinal side of the hall can freely observe the ongoing processes.

The test equipment on the continuous floor is freely configurable, with a travelling overhead crane moving heavy loads to where they are required. A transverse engineering zone and a network of supply ducts in the floor take services into every nook and cranny. A special feature is the mobile room modules, which can be positioned exactly where they need to be – close to the action but not in the way. While the interior of ARENA2036 represents a built research prospectus for the industrial production floor of the future, the exterior of the building shows off some iconic elements. State-of-the-art, modified north light roofs ensure optimum daylight and glare-free internal working conditions while signalling to the outside world that this novel, eye-catching structure is an industrial building. The whole of the production hall appears as if it has been elevated by a continuous transparent ground floor and loses the heaviness normally radiated by a large industrial building. The facade of brushed, folded aluminium reflects the colours and light from its surroundings and contributes to this effect.
Arena2036

Research Centre Arena2036

Research Centre ARENA2036 – Building Information

Client: Land Baden-Württemberg, Betrieb Vermögen und Bau, vertreten durch das Universitätsbauamt Stuttgart und Hohenheim
User: ARENA2036 GFA 10.292 sqm
Planning Period: 2014 – 2015
Construction Period: 2015 – 2016
Location: Stuttgart, DE
Financing: In half with financial medium of the Europäischen Union (EFRE-Mittel) und dem Land BadenWürttemberg
Architect: HENN GmbH
Structural Engineer: Pfefferkorn Ingenieure GbR
MEP Services Engineer: Planungsgruppe M+M AG
Building: Sciences Bauphysik 5
Landscape Architect: Koeber Landschaftsarchitektur
Fire Engineering: Gruner GmbH
Health and Saftey Consultant: Ingenieur- & Technologie- Center
Land Surveying: Hils, Beratende Ingenieure
Geotechnical Investigation: Smoltczyk & Partner GmbH
Project Management: wpm Projektmanagement
Civil Engineering: Reik Ingenieurgesellschaft
Site Supervision: Ernst²

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart information / images received 310317


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.




Stuttgart Architecture Walking Tours

Stuttgart Buildings

Porsche Museum
Design: Delugan Meissl, Architects
Porsche Museum Stuttgart building
image © Delugan Meissl Associated Architects

Porsche Museum Stuttgart building

Mercedes-Benz Museum
Design: UNStudio, Architects
Mercedes-Benz Museum Stuttgart
photo : Christian Richters

Mercedes-Benz Museum Stuttgart




Stuttgart Research Buildings

Center Solar Energy Hydrogen Research

Centre for Virtual Engineering

DHWB University Building

Daimler Headquarters

Comments / photos for the Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart – ICD/ITKE page welcome

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart – page

Website: HENN

The post Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart appeared first on e-architect.



from e-architect http://ift.tt/2nSI3Hq
via

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart

Research Centre ARENA2036, Stuttgart, German Building, Architecture Images

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart

University Building, south west Germany – design by HENN architects

31 Mar 2017

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart

Architects: HENN

Location: Stuttgart, Germany

Research Centre ARENA2036

Research Centre Arena2036

How will the architecture of Industry 4.0 look? What role will people play in the factory of the future? ARENA2036, which will be handed over to its users on 30.03.2017 at the University of Stuttgart’s research campus in Vaihingen, reveals the architecture of completely digitalised and networked production.

Research Centre Arena2036

ARENA2036 stands for „Active Research Environment for the Next Generation of Automobiles“ and makes reference to the 150th anniversary of the first production automobile. Universities, industry and small and medium-sized enterprises come together in the research factory to work on the future of the automobile. Not only the product but also its production process is being completely rethought.

Research Centre Arena2036

Just as the fully automated production of past decades left the assembly line structure intact, in the future all parts will be dynamically actively and freely combinable in space and time in Industry 4.0. As soon as the partially assembled vehicles have wheels and an electric drive, they move under their own power and control to the specific series of downstream production stations that will result in their configuration to order. The vehicle – a robot that assembles itself. Machines and products are beginning to communicate with one another in real time, which calls into question their interface with people. Visual communication is therefore a key precondition for the development work at ARENA2036. No columns obstruct the view of the complex processes across the multifunctional assembly hall. Everyone in the workshops and laboratories of the transverse end block and in the project offices and meeting rooms on the 1st floor along the longitudinal side of the hall can freely observe the ongoing processes.

The test equipment on the continuous floor is freely configurable, with a travelling overhead crane moving heavy loads to where they are required. A transverse engineering zone and a network of supply ducts in the floor take services into every nook and cranny. A special feature is the mobile room modules, which can be positioned exactly where they need to be – close to the action but not in the way. While the interior of ARENA2036 represents a built research prospectus for the industrial production floor of the future, the exterior of the building shows off some iconic elements. State-of-the-art, modified north light roofs ensure optimum daylight and glare-free internal working conditions while signalling to the outside world that this novel, eye-catching structure is an industrial building. The whole of the production hall appears as if it has been elevated by a continuous transparent ground floor and loses the heaviness normally radiated by a large industrial building. The facade of brushed, folded aluminium reflects the colours and light from its surroundings and contributes to this effect.
Arena2036

Research Centre Arena2036

Research Centre ARENA2036 – Building Information

Client: Land Baden-Württemberg, Betrieb Vermögen und Bau, vertreten durch das Universitätsbauamt Stuttgart und Hohenheim
User: ARENA2036 GFA 10.292 sqm
Planning Period: 2014 – 2015
Construction Period: 2015 – 2016
Location: Stuttgart, DE
Financing: In half with financial medium of the Europäischen Union (EFRE-Mittel) und dem Land BadenWürttemberg
Architect: HENN GmbH
Structural Engineer: Pfefferkorn Ingenieure GbR
MEP Services Engineer: Planungsgruppe M+M AG
Building: Sciences Bauphysik 5
Landscape Architect: Koeber Landschaftsarchitektur
Fire Engineering: Gruner GmbH
Health and Saftey Consultant: Ingenieur- & Technologie- Center
Land Surveying: Hils, Beratende Ingenieure
Geotechnical Investigation: Smoltczyk & Partner GmbH
Project Management: wpm Projektmanagement
Civil Engineering: Reik Ingenieurgesellschaft
Site Supervision: Ernst²

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart information / images received 310317


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.




Stuttgart Architecture Walking Tours

Stuttgart Buildings

Porsche Museum
Design: Delugan Meissl, Architects
Porsche Museum Stuttgart building
image © Delugan Meissl Associated Architects

Porsche Museum Stuttgart building

Mercedes-Benz Museum
Design: UNStudio, Architects
Mercedes-Benz Museum Stuttgart
photo : Christian Richters

Mercedes-Benz Museum Stuttgart




Stuttgart Research Buildings

Center Solar Energy Hydrogen Research

Centre for Virtual Engineering

DHWB University Building

Daimler Headquarters

Comments / photos for the Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart – ICD/ITKE page welcome

Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart – page

Website: HENN

The post Research Centre ARENA2036 in Stuttgart appeared first on e-architect.



from e-architect http://ift.tt/2nSI3Hq
via

Colombian town turns down $35B gold mine - prefers a clean environment

A small Colombian town just rejected a $35 billion gold mine project. Around 98 percent of the residents in Cajamarca said no to the mine due to concerns over the environment and water pollution - and Colombian Mining Minister German Arce doesn't seem too happy. Related:

from Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://ift.tt/2oGLOwv
via

New Hotel Tofana Building

New Hotel Tofana Building, Italian Alps Building, St. Kassian / S. Cassiano Development

New Hotel Tofana

Alpine Hotel Accommodation in Bolzano, South Tyrol – design by noa*

31 Mar 2017

New Hotel Tofana, t. Kassian / S. Cassiano

Design: noa*

Location: Province of Bolzano – South Tyrol

Italian Accommodation in the Alps

New Hotel Tofana, St. Kassian / S. Cassiano, Northern Italy

The dynamic personality of the two Yoga and Pilates instructors, mountain bikers, ski and snowboard instructors and mountaineers has led the new Tofana to adapt to these two athletic powerhouses: the “mountain” becomes an abstract conceptual inspiration for the entire architecture. The hotel acts as a “base camp” for the guest.

Hotel Tofana design by noa

In the demolition and reconstruction of the Hotel Tofana in St. Kassian / S. Cassiano in Badia Valley (IT), the surrounding mountain range served as inspiration for the new architecture and interior design. The concept of the new “Explorer’s Home” transfers the athletic spirit of the owner family to the entire building.

Hotel Tofana design by noa* – network of architecture

New Hotel Tofana images / information received from noa*

noa*


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.




Hotel Buildings

Italian Hotel Buildings

Another Italian hotel building by noa* on e-architect:

Hotel Valentinerhof, Kastelruth, northern Italy
noa*
Hotel Valentinerhof
photo from architect

Hotel Valentinerhof – 6 Jan 2013

Another Italian hotel building on e-architect:

Hotel Pupp in Brixen, north Italy

Italian Architecture in major cities : news + key projects
Domus Technica Brescello
photo : Roland Halbe

Italian Buildings : Projects outwith major cities
Cesena Housing
image from architects




Italian Architect

Strata Hotel, Sesto
Design: Plasma Studio
Strata Hotel
picture from architect

Italian hotel building

Buildings / photos for the New Hotel TofanaNorth Italy Accommodation Architecture page welcome

New Hotel Tofana Building

The post New Hotel Tofana Building appeared first on e-architect.



from e-architect http://ift.tt/2opu0qH
via

New Hotel Tofana Building

New Hotel Tofana Building, Italian Alps Building, St. Kassian / S. Cassiano Development

New Hotel Tofana

Alpine Hotel Accommodation in Bolzano, South Tyrol – design by noa*

31 Mar 2017

New Hotel Tofana, t. Kassian / S. Cassiano

Design: noa*

Location: Province of Bolzano – South Tyrol

Italian Accommodation in the Alps

New Hotel Tofana, St. Kassian / S. Cassiano, Northern Italy

The dynamic personality of the two Yoga and Pilates instructors, mountain bikers, ski and snowboard instructors and mountaineers has led the new Tofana to adapt to these two athletic powerhouses: the “mountain” becomes an abstract conceptual inspiration for the entire architecture. The hotel acts as a “base camp” for the guest.

Hotel Tofana design by noa

In the demolition and reconstruction of the Hotel Tofana in St. Kassian / S. Cassiano in Badia Valley (IT), the surrounding mountain range served as inspiration for the new architecture and interior design. The concept of the new “Explorer’s Home” transfers the athletic spirit of the owner family to the entire building.

Hotel Tofana design by noa* – network of architecture

New Hotel Tofana images / information received from noa*

noa*


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.




Hotel Buildings

Italian Hotel Buildings

Another Italian hotel building by noa* on e-architect:

Hotel Valentinerhof, Kastelruth, northern Italy
noa*
Hotel Valentinerhof
photo from architect

Hotel Valentinerhof – 6 Jan 2013

Another Italian hotel building on e-architect:

Hotel Pupp in Brixen, north Italy

Italian Architecture in major cities : news + key projects
Domus Technica Brescello
photo : Roland Halbe

Italian Buildings : Projects outwith major cities
Cesena Housing
image from architects




Italian Architect

Strata Hotel, Sesto
Design: Plasma Studio
Strata Hotel
picture from architect

Italian hotel building

Buildings / photos for the New Hotel TofanaNorth Italy Accommodation Architecture page welcome

New Hotel Tofana Building

The post New Hotel Tofana Building appeared first on e-architect.



from e-architect http://ift.tt/2opu0qH
via

Former garment factory next to NYC's High Line to be topped with new green spaces

The Warehouse, a massive multi-unit complex a mere stone's throw away from the High Line in New York City, is getting a facelift. A garment factory in a previous life, the 65,000-square-foot space currently houses a parking garage and art galleries. But Elijah Equities, the real-estate firm that is redeveloping the building, has grander plans. With the help of the architects at Morris Adjmi, Elijah Equities is looking to transform the Warehouse into 100,000 square feet of office and...

from Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://ift.tt/2oj6U87
via

Kniterate is an open-source machine that lets you 'print' your own clothes

Related:OpenKnit: An Open-Source “Clothing Printer” That Lets You Make Your Own Garments “I wish it generates enthusiasm in makers and tinkerers so more machines are created, that way a community would flourish and the project would evolve collectively and organically, since every new user becomes a developer,” Rubio explains when we asked what he hopes to come of his OpenKnit platform. “The possibilities of this technology are awesome. The next milestone, beside improving its reliability,...

from Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://ift.tt/2nStxPB
via

ExxonMobil exhorts White House to keep Paris agreement

When a fossil fuel company under fire for covering up past knowledge of climate change exhorts the President of the United States to stay in the 2015 Paris agreement, something's not quite right.

from Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green BuildingInhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building http://ift.tt/2nmBRna
via

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV

Patrick-Henry-Village Heidelberg, PHV Building, German Architecture

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV

International Architecture Exhibition (IBA), Germany – design by KCAP Architects&Planners

31 Mar 2017

Patrick-Henry-Village Heidelberg

US military site in Heidelberg will become future knowledge city

Design: KCAP Architects&Planners

Rotterdam/Zurich, March 30th, 2017 – Yesterday, KCAP presented the development vision for the Patrick-Henry-Village (PHV) in Heidelberg, Germany. PHV is the largest conversion area in Heidelberg, set to become a model for the ‘knowledge city of tomorrow‘.

Visuals © KCAP

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV

Initiated by the International Architecture Exhibition (IBA) Heidelberg, thematic scenarios for the development and future use of the area have been designed by a group renown urban planning offices in a collaborative process. KCAP has integrated those scenarios as well as feedback from experts, the municipality and citizens in an urban development vision which forms base for the future transformation of PHV.

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV

Potential for future development

Patrick-Henry Village, with formerly 8.000 inhabitants, is one of many former US military sites in Germany that reveals great development potential for the city. The IBA Heidelberg wants to demonstrate possible solutions for the conversion of these areas and uses PHV as their urban laboratory.

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV

The 100 ha site of PHV will offer space for more than 10.000 inhabitants including a large number of work spaces. The development vision allows for a flexible and phased development that can respond to unforeseen and changing conditions. With a size similar to the surrounding centralities, PHV will establish itself as new city quarter of Heidelberg within Rhein-Neckar metropolitan region.

With respect for the historical urban design, buildings and infrastructures, an urban inside-out principle has been developed in which the existing street pattern with villas and rows of buildings in the green will remain to form a ‘garden city’ area. Outside of the existing parkway, micro-quarters with a densified mixed-use building program will as innovative combination of living, working and urban production be the driving force of the development. Educational buildings as polyvalent neighborhood structures add community building potential to the micro-quarters

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV

Planning Phase_0

Phase_0 is a coproduction of IBA, five planning teams and experts. The planners MVRDV (NL), Carlo Ratti Associati (IT), ASTOC (DE), Ramboll Liveable Cities Lab (DE) and the University of Brighton (UK) elaborated future scenarios for the development of PHV. This took place during various participatory thematic Design Thinking Workshops from June until November 2016. With the outcome of Phase_0 as its base, KCAP Architects&Planners has developed the urban development vision.

Visuals below © IBA Heidelberg_Christian Buck

IBA Heidelberg is a temporary laboratory. Our motto: Knowledge | Based | Urbanism. Because a city that invests in avant-garde knowledge facilities invests in the future. Through local and international networks, the IBA will through 2022 weave a net of experts, supporters and active participants. The projects include innovative schools and research buildings, museums and student housing. However, just as important as the actual built results are the IBA’s invisible achievements. In Heidelberg it is initiating a dialog on the city of tomorrow. http://ift.tt/2d9FsTP

International Building Exhibition (IBA) have existed for over 100 years. They are planning and building experiments with an impact that extends far beyond their own time. While the first IBAs broke new ground with their built architecture, IBAs have changed substantially since then: Today, they are exhibitions of building culture that increasingly incorporate complex social, economic and ecological aspects, in addition to aesthetic and technological matters.

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV Building images / information from KCAP

KCAP Architects

4 Mar 2017
KCAP wins international design competition ‘Sewoon District #4’ in Seoul, Korea

Sewoon District #4 area in Seoul design by KCAP

Sewoon District #4 area in Seoul building design by KCAP

Visuals © KCAP Architects&Planners

8 Feb 2017
Jurong Lake District Masterplan
Jurong Lake District Masterplan
Jurong Lake District Masterplan in Singapore by KCAP

24 Jan 2017
KCAP wins competition for transformation shipyard area in Korneuburg, Austria
Shipyard Area in Korneuburg
Shipyard Area in Korneuburg by KCAP Architects&Planners

10 Oct 2016

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park + Storage Building

Design: LAVA with A24, White Void, Priedemann and Transsolar

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park + Building

FROM STORAGE CYLINDER TO CITY ICON

Beacon, knowledge centre, tourist attraction and … energy storagecentre.

LAVA’s winning architecture competition entry for an energy park and energy storage building in Heidelberg, Germany for the Stadtwerke Heidelberg, will commence construction in 2017.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

The existing cylindrical-shaped storage centre is transformed into a dynamic sculpture, a city icon, a knowledge hub on sustainable energy and fully accessible to the public with city views.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

LAVA assembled a Berlin-based expert team to develop the design concept including A24, White Void, Priedemann and Transsolar.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

LAVA’s solution was a multi-layered facade structure, inspired by the geometries of nature – leaves, spider webs and reptile skins. The result is a dynamic, ever-changing surface of light and shadow, animated by wind, turning the building into a beacon of a dynamic new energy regime.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

An inner shell coloured in different shades of blue wraps the building. Tilted elliptical rings positioned around the cylinder continue in the outer façade with “energy loops” circling the structure and rising dramatically to the top. A cable network between the steel rings forms the outer façade layer.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

Around 20,000 diamond-shaped plates of thin stainless steel are hooked with a simple elastic connection in the meshes of this steel network allowing them to twist up to 90 degrees in the wind.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

“This number of plates matches the number of households supplied with energy by the network,” said Wallisser, “a visual signifier of the impact new technology can make.”

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

“The complex interplay of movement, light and shadow is generated by sun and wind, with no additional energy or complicated technology required.” At night the inner shell is illuminated in the colours blue, green and white with LED lamps mounted below the stairs.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

Visitors will experience this exciting place as a three-dimensional structure.
Across a bridge, they will reach an elliptical entrance level. Two elevators
take them on a journey, giving panoramic views as they are transported to a
roof terrace with large staggered terraces and event spaces and a bistro. The
emergency stairs are two vertical promenades of knowledge.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

The access bridge, the facade and the transfer of knowledge elements are all
designed as different sized oval-shaped steel elements with varying
orientations.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

Visitors will be able to receive information throughout the three-dimensional
energy park, from the challenges of energy transition in the city of
Heidelberg, to technical details of the utility company Stadtwerke, to
renewable energy sources on site.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

The thermal storage complex will be one of the tallest buildings in Heidelberg
at 56m high. It will be a key component of the application of renewable
energy as it compensates the gap between heat production and consumption
in the city.

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

Wallisser added: “Our new ‘knowledge repository’ replaces a gas tank, which
in the 1950s was a symbol of energy policy. It will be a strong symbol of the
transition towards renewables.”

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

Stadtwerke Heidelberg Energie Park

NCT Heidelberg

LAVA


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.




German Buildings

German Architects

National Centre for Tumour Diseases (NCT) in Heidelberg
Design: Behnisch Architekten
NCT Heidelberg Building
image from architect

National Centre For Tumour Diseases Heidelberg

German Buildings

OZEANEUM, Stralsund, Baltic Coast, northeast Germany
Design: Behnisch Architekten
Ozeaneum
photo : Roland Halbe
Ozeaneum : new Oceanographic Museum

Bad Aibling Thermal Spa, Germany
Design: Behnisch Architekten
Bad Aibling Thermal Spa
picture : Adam Mørk / Torben Eskerod
German Spa building




German Houses

German museum building : Folkwang Museum, Essen

Frankfurt Architects

New German house : Dupli.Casa – House near Ludwigsburg

Comments / photos for the Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV building page welcome

Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV Germany – page

Website: Heidelberg

The post Patrick-Henry-Village in Heidelberg: PHV appeared first on e-architect.



from e-architect http://ift.tt/2oiYoG3
via